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About Hoag Library

Mission Statement​

Hoag Library enriches and empowers the people of its community by promoting access to ideas and information and by supporting lifelong learning and love of reading. The library provides relevant materials, ensures equal access to information services, and promotes cultural and learning experiences through programming.

New Year’s Day
Memorial Day
Independence Day Observed
Labor Day
Thanksgiving Eve close early at 5 p.m.
Thanksgiving
Christmas Eve
Christmas
New Year’s Eve close early at 5 p.m.

Library Closings

Driving Directions

From the North
Take Route 98 south towards Albion. Venture over the Erie Canal. Travel through two traffic lights. Hoag Library is on your right before you cross the railroad tracks.

 

From Route 104 East (Ridge Road)
Travel west on Route 104 (Ridge Road) until you reach the town of Childs. There will be a traffic light at this intersection of Route 104 and Route 98. Landmarks are The Cobblestone Museum and Tillman’s Village Inn. Turn left at the traffic light and proceed south on Route 98. You will reach a 5-corner intersection and a stop sign. Stay on Route 98 South (main route) by veering left. Venture over the Erie Canal. Travel through two traffic lights. Hoag Library is on your right before you cross the railroad tracks.

 

From Route 104 West (Ridge Road)
Travel east on Route 104 (Ridge Road) until you reach the town of Childs. There will be a traffic light at this intersection of Route 104 and Route 98. Landmarks are The Cobblestone Museum and Tillman’s Village Inn. Turn right at the traffic light and proceed south on Route 98. You will reach a 5-corner intersection and a stop sign. Stay on Route 98 South (main route) by veering left. Venture over the Erie Canal. Travel through two traffic lights. Hoag Library is on your right before you cross the railroad tracks.

 

From Route 98 South
Travel north on Route 98 through the Town of Barre. You will come to a 4-way flashing red light, go straight through light and you will come into the Village of Albion. Go through one traffic light, over railroad tracks and the library will be on the left.

How do I obtain a library card?

If you are over 13 years of age, photo I.D./Student I.D./Driver’s License, with your address on it will be required. If your address is not current, we need to see a piece of mail addressed to you with your current address on it. Library card is issued instantly and ready for use.

If you are under 13 years of age, you need to have a parent/guardian with you at time of registration to verify who you are and to sign your application. Library card is issued instantly and ready for use.

How long can I borrow my materials for?
Most books, DVDs, videos, and CDs are on a 21-day loan. New releases are on a 7-day loan. Most can be renewed if no one is waiting for them.

How do I renew my books/movies/CDs/magazines?
You can renew materials by calling the library at 585-589-4246, visiting the Library, with the catalog app, or through your account on www.nioga.org.

I am looking for a specific author, subject & title. Where do I go to find them?
You may visit the NIOGA Catalog (www.nioga.org) and conduct your specific search, call the library at 585-589-4246, search on the catalog app, or visit the library.

What computer services do you offer?
We currently have 8 PC computers that are open to all patrons with a library card in good standing (fines under $3.00).

Each computer features office programs like Microsoft Word, Excel, and Adobe Reader, as well as popular web browsers including Google Chrome & Mozilla Firefox. All computers operate on Windows 10, and our internet utilizes Spectrum for optimum speed.

 

The library has a black & white/color printer that all public computers are connected to. Black & white printouts are 10 cents each. Color printouts are 50 cents each. Computer lab users have a maximum of 90 minutes per day at their computer terminal.

 

Patrons with a library card in good standing can request a laptop for use in-house.

 

Wi-Fi is available throughout the building and parking lot- no password required.

 

How do I utilize the EV (Electric Vehicle) charging stations in the parking lot?

Please download the EV Connect app to your smart device and follow the prompts.

How do I utilize the IT Lending Library? What is included?

Eligible non-profits with library cards in good standing can check-out a Presentation Kit that includes: Conference Camera, Mouse, Chromebook, Projector

How do I download eBooks, Audiobooks, and eMagazines?

The Hoopla app and Libby app are free with your library card.

Where can I donate used glasses and hearing aids?

Lions Clubs International has a donation box located in the main lobby.

FAQ's

History

If you have ever been to the old Swan Library building, you’d know immediately after walking in that it used to be a home. The building was the former Burrows’ Mansion.

Founding of Swan Library 1890 – 1900

William and Emma Swan, Albion residents, began looking at libraries at home and abroad, planning their gift to Albion. However, they had not begun the library when William died on November 10, 1896. The executors of the will, Emma Swan (1836-1904) and Judge Isaac Signor (1842-1935), now began the task of establishing the building, obtaining a charter, and hiring a librarian. These two executors would directly influence the library for the next 39 years and their decisions still affect the library today.

The codicil to William G. Swan’s will directed the executors to erect the building as soon as possible after his death; to state that if the county provided a lot, the library would be for the whole county, otherwise for Albion only; and that the executors should incorporate The Swan Memorial Library Association and turn over the building and remaining money to the association within five years of Swan’s death.

 

On April 2, 1895, Swan added a second codicil to his will, stating that he intended to build the library in his lifetime, if his health permitted. If he died before he built the library or before it was complete, his executors should complete it as in the first codicil.

 

Evidently when the executors began to look for a spot to build their library, they found that $35,000 was not much to buy a lot, erect a building, and buy equipment and books, especially when George Pullman’s $65,000 church dominated Courthouse Square.

 

Deciding that they could not build a library building, the executors bought the Roswell S. Burrows mansion, built in 1854 on the northwest corner of the Courthouse Square, for $6,000. The Burrows mansion seemed to be a good choice: it was on the Courthouse Square between the primary school in Central Hall and the high school on West Academy Street.

 

It seemed huge in comparison to the two rooms occupied by the Albion Free Town and Albion Public Libraries. This mansion also had special meaning; Burrows had been the richest man in Albion, he had been William Swan’s employer as the majority stockholder in the suspension bridge, and he had been a staunch Baptist.

 

The plans for the change from a mansion to a library were made by architect J. Mills Platt of Rochester. In the first two weeks of April 1899, local contractor Ozro Bates removed the addition on the rear and tore our the interior partitions in the mansion to give the contractors a clearer idea of what would be necessary for the conversion. Construction started in late spring under contractor George P. Harris.

 

The Burrows mansion was in a restrained Greek Revival style. There were simple double pilasters at the corners and in the center of the east and south sides. The bases of the central pilasters were supported by wide porches. Coupled doric columns supported porticoes with flat roofs and solid balustrades that matched the balustrade on the roof. There was a simple entablature with five small windows in the frieze on the front. The windows were six over six and all had shutters.

 

The interior was complete by January, 1900.

“The reading room runs the length of the building on the north side. It is finished in oak, with two alcove bridges supported by columns to break the space. Two cases for reference books are provided. The librarian’s desk faces this room, while a window opens into the hall on her right for receiving and giving out books without disturbing readers. A door at her left communicates with the library. The cases are metallic, olive green, arranged both around the walls and in back to back stands. The trustees think the present housing will accommodate 14,000 volumes,” said The Orleans Republican newspaper.

To learn more about the history of the Swan Library building, copies of Albion Historian Neil Johnson’s book “Books and Money” are available in the Friends of the Library book sale room.

Moving Toward the Future

Eventually, a bigger space was deemed necessary. Stacks were stuffed and the children’s section certainly needed an upgrade. Patrons also needed more parking than the few spaces offered immediately around the Swan building.

In October 2009, the Board of Trustees purchased the lot at 134 South Main Street, the location of the former Dale’s Supermarket. In January 2010, the Board of Trustees selected King & King Architects LLP of Syracuse, NY, to create the new building.

In July 2012, the new library opened under the new name of Hoag Library. The new facility is 14,600 square feet and features a local history room, a separate children’s library, a large meeting room area, a cafe and lounge, and more.

Today, the Hoag building is still our current location and we encourage you to visit and see what materials and services we have to offer.

History

Monday-Thursday 10am-8pm
Friday 10am-5pm
Saturday 10am-2pm


(Computer lab closes 15 minutes before the building)

Hours